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Increased Goals…Increased Enthusiasm

Do small goals yield small results? Should you set your sights on the “moon”?  What if you know (in your mind) that you cannot reach the moon? What is meant by a “stretch goal”? How do you set a goal? Should a goal be general or specific?  How important is it to set the right goal?

Whether a business is just starting or is an existing business in need of a new Strategic focus Plan, the hardest part of the process is the goal selection process. Goals can set boundaries; a small goal can limit the growth of a company, in a sense, it creates a fence around the firms’ expansion capabilities.

An exercise I often suggest to my clients is as follows:

  • Write down three goals that are important to you at this point in your life.
  • These three goals can pertain to your business or personal life.
  • Over the next few days answer the following questions about each goal:
    • Why was this goal selected?
    • Does this goal inspire you?
    • If these goals do not inspire you then you have to set bigger goals
    • If the goals were selected to please someone other than yourself, you are headed in the wrong direction.

Goals are the driving force in a business leader’s life. If you are inspired, so is your staff, your customers/clients, family, and everyone else you come in contact with. The word GOAL is a lot easier to understand and make part of your life than using terms like mission and vision statements. ( yes, we eventually will come up with both a mission and vision statement)

Describing your goals should be in a specific enough format so that they can be broken down into a series of mini-business plan steps. With the big picture in mind, we now can develop the steps necessary to achieve these great goals. I use the plural term,   goals, because I believe that every business leader is capable of incorporating several goals into the business.

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together.         Thomas Carlyle

Nick J. Petra   subscribe  to this blog at www.strategicduck.com

Make it a Successful today!

 

Do small goals yield small results? Should you set your sights on the “moon”?  What if you know (in your mind) that you cannot reach the moon? What is meant by a “stretch goal”? How do you set a goal? Should a goal be general or specific?  How important is it to set the right goal?

Whether a business is just starting or is an existing business in need of a new Strategic focus Plan, the hardest part of the process is the goal selection process. Goals can set boundaries; a small goal can limit the growth of a company, in a sense, it creates a fence around the firms’ expansion capabilities.

An exercise I often suggest to my clients is as follows:

  • Write down three goals that are important to you at this point in your life.
  • These three goals can pertain to your business or personal life.
  • Over the next few days answer the following questions about each goal:
    • Why was this goal selected?
    • Does this goal inspire you?
    • If these goals do not inspire you then you have to set bigger goals
    • If the goals were selected to please someone other than yourself, you are headed in the wrong direction.

Goals are the driving force in a business leader’s life. If you are inspired, so is your staff, your customers/clients, family, and everyone else you come in contact with. The word GOAL is a lot easier to understand and make part of your life than using terms like mission and vision statements. ( yes, we eventually will come up with both a mission and vision statement)

Describing your goals should be in a specific enough format so that they can be broken down into a series of mini-business plan steps. With the big picture in mind, we now can develop the steps necessary to achieve these great goals. I use the plural term,   goals, because I believe that every business leader is capable of incorporating several goals into the business.

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together.         Thomas Carlyle

Nick J. Petra   subscribe  to this blog at www.strategicduck.com

Make it a Successful today!

 

Do small goals yield small results? Should you set your sights on the “moon”?  What if you know (in your mind) that you cannot reach the moon? What is meant by a “stretch goal”? How do you set a goal? Should a goal be general or specific?  How important is it to set the right goal?

Whether a business is just starting or is an existing business in need of a new Strategic focus Plan, the hardest part of the process is the goal selection process. Goals can set boundaries; a small goal can limit the growth of a company, in a sense, it creates a fence around the firms’ expansion capabilities.

An exercise I often suggest to my clients is as follows:

  • Write down three goals that are important to you at this point in your life.
  • These three goals can pertain to your business or personal life.
  • Over the next few days answer the following questions about each goal:
    • Why was this goal selected?
    • Does this goal inspire you?
    • If these goals do not inspire you then you have to set bigger goals
    • If the goals were selected to please someone other than yourself, you are headed in the wrong direction.

Goals are the driving force in a business leader’s life. If you are inspired, so is your staff, your customers/clients, family, and everyone else you come in contact with. The word GOAL is a lot easier to understand and make part of your life than using terms like mission and vision statements. ( yes, we eventually will come up with both a mission and vision statement)

Describing your goals should be in a specific enough format so that they can be broken down into a series of mini-business plan steps. With the big picture in mind, we now can develop the steps necessary to achieve these great goals. I use the plural term,   goals, because I believe that every business leader is capable of incorporating several goals into the business.

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together.         Thomas Carlyle

Nick J. Petra   subscribe  to this blog at www.strategicduck.com

Make it a Successful today!

 

Do small goals yield small results? Should you set your sights on the “moon”?  What if you know (in your mind) that you cannot reach the moon? What is meant by a “stretch goal”? How do you set a goal? Should a goal be general or specific?  How important is it to set the right goal?

Whether a business is just starting or is an existing business in need of a new Strategic focus Plan, the hardest part of the process is the goal selection process. Goals can set boundaries; a small goal can limit the growth of a company, in a sense, it creates a fence around the firms’ expansion capabilities.

An exercise I often suggest to my clients is as follows:

  • Write down three goals that are important to you at this point in your life.
  • These three goals can pertain to your business or personal life.
  • Over the next few days answer the following questions about each goal:
    • Why was this goal selected?
    • Does this goal inspire you?
    • If these goals do not inspire you then you have to set bigger goals
    • If the goals were selected to please someone other than yourself, you are headed in the wrong direction.

Goals are the driving force in a business leader’s life. If you are inspired, so is your staff, your customers/clients, family, and everyone else you come in contact with. The word GOAL is a lot easier to understand and make part of your life than using terms like mission and vision statements. ( yes, we eventually will come up with both a mission and vision statement)

Describing your goals should be in a specific enough format so that they can be broken down into a series of mini-business plan steps. With the big picture in mind, we now can develop the steps necessary to achieve these great goals. I use the plural term,   goals, because I believe that every business leader is capable of incorporating several goals into the business.

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together.         Thomas Carlyle

Nick J. Petra   subscribe  to this blog at www.strategicduck.com

Make it a Successful today!

 

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